• SX8B0009

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved Lysol Disinfectant Spray to combat SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved Lysol Disinfectant Spray to combat SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), based on the findings of a study published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the agency announced in a press release.

As COVID-19 case counts climbed earlier this year, multiple sanitizers and disinfectants made claims of activity against the virus, but only EPA-approved products can legally market that way. With this week’s approval, Lysol Disinfectant Spray (EPA Reg No. 777-99) and Lysol Disinfectant Max Cover Mist (EPA Reg No. 777-127) were found to inactivate the pathogen at 2 minutes of use on hard, non-porous surfaces, per EPA testing guidelines.

The AJIC peer-reviewed study evaluated the effectiveness of multiple products against SARS-CoV-2 and reported 99.9% efficacy for Lysol in particular.

Surface disinfection has been a key focus for investigators during the pandemic, as it wasn’t initially clear just how long SARS-CoV-2 could live on various surfaces. Currently, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains that “it may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. This is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads, but we are still learning more about how this virus spreads.”

The CDC recommends thorough disinfection using EPA-registered disinfectants on the agency’s List N.

“The transmission of viral respiratory pathogens such as COVID-19 can be minimized by thorough and complete application of an EPA-registered disinfectant per the manufacturer’s instructions, that is included on EPA’s List N, to surfaces as well as good personal hygiene, including hand hygiene, minimize contact with your face, and respiratory hygiene/cough etiquette,” William A. Rutala, PhD, MPH, CIC, and David J. Weber, MD, MPH, wrote in an article for Infection Control Today®.


Post time: Jun-03-2020